Main

Is High Octane Gas Really Needed?

One of the things people commonly overlook when buying a car is checking which type of fuel it requires. People are so focused on…
Main

Hydrogen Cars Now

Hyundai and Toyota are two companies leading the way in terms of hydrogen cars – so it’s safe to say that they’re not just…

Is High Octane Gas Really Needed?

One of the things people commonly overlook when buying a car is checking which type of fuel it requires. People are so focused on the driving experience, how it looks,…

Hydrogen Cars Now

Hyundai and Toyota are two companies leading the way in terms of hydrogen cars – so it’s safe to say that they’re not just a thing of the future, but…

Is High Octane Gas Really Needed?

One of the things people commonly overlook when buying a car is checking which type of fuel it requires. People are so focused on the driving experience, how it looks,…

Hydrogen Cars Now

Hyundai and Toyota are two companies leading the way in terms of hydrogen cars – so it’s safe to say that they’re not just a thing of the future, but…

Is High Octane Gas Really Needed?

One of the things people commonly overlook when buying a car is checking which type of fuel it requires. People are so focused on the driving experience, how it looks,…

Hydrogen Cars Now

Hyundai and Toyota are two companies leading the way in terms of hydrogen cars – so it’s safe to say that they’re not just a thing of the future, but…
Main

Hydrogen Cars Now

Hyundai and Toyota are two companies leading the way in terms of hydrogen cars – so it’s safe to say…

Is High Octane Gas Really Needed?

Main
One of the things people commonly overlook when buying a car is checking which type of fuel it requires. People are so focused on the driving experience, how it looks, and how the seats feel that they never think to open the fuel door or read the owner’s manual. It’s…

Hydrogen Cars Now

Main
Hyundai and Toyota are two companies leading the way in terms of hydrogen cars – so it’s safe to say that they’re not just a thing of the future, but they’re very much a reality now. When H2 cars become more widespread, the United States will be less dependent on…

Is High Octane Gas Really Needed?

One of the things people commonly overlook when buying a car is checking which type of fuel it requires. People are so focused on the driving experience, how it looks, and how the seats feel that they never think to open the fuel door or read the owner’s manual. It’s important to take note of this kind of detail because using the wrong fuel type can damage your car.

Higher octane fuel has a higher ignition point, which is necessary to prevent pinging (or preignition) in high compression engines.Compressing the fuel air mixture at a higher pressure is what allows some engines to produce more power despite their size. These are called high-compression engines.

If you buy a car with a high-compression engine, you’ll have to use higher octane fuel, which costs 25-40 cents more per gallon.

If your manufacturer recommends 93 octane, that means the car is designed to run best on 93 octane fuel. The car may have slightly more power and better gas mileage when you use 93 octane, but it also means that the car has a knock sensor. This sensor will adjust the spark timing when you use lower octane fuel, to prevent the engine from pinging and overheating.

On the other hand, cars that “require” high octane fuel also have knock sensors, manufacturers make no guarantee that you won’t damage your engine if you run it on regular fuel. Even though there’s a higher chance of damaging your engine, many people choose to cheap out and go with the lower grade gas.

If a car requires high octane fuel, it means that the manufacturer doesn’t guarantee that your engine will be safe if you use regular fuel instead. So, if you see a car that says it “requires” 93 octane fuel, then you should be aware that you might damage the engine if you use cheaper fuel.

Keep this in mind when you’re car shopping, so you can decide whether you want a car that requires high octane fuel or not. And then you’ll know whether you have to choose between the Five Series and Fido.

Does higher octane clean your engine?

High octane gasoline will not clean your engine better than regular gasoline. In fact, high octane gasoline does not have any benefits in preventing engine deposits, removing them, or cleaning your car’s engine.

Does high octane fuel make a difference?

The octane rating is a measure of a fuel’s ability to resist “knocking” or “pinging” during combustion, caused by the air/fuel mixture detonating prematurely in the engine. … In order to prevent this knocking, higher octane fuels are used in high performance engines that run at higher compression ratios.

Does premium gas give better mileage?

Premium gas might give you a few more miles per gallon than regular gas, but you’re not getting as much of a difference as you might think. In fact, the fuel economy will vary more between different brands of regular gas than it will between the same manufacturer’s regular and premium gas.

What happens if you put 93 instead of 87?

If you accidentally put in a higher octane blend of gasoline than what you usually use (say, 91, 92, or 93), don’t fret. You’re not damaging your car or truck by filling it with a gas that burns differently in your engine. In fact, you might even see a slight improvement in your car’s performance!

Hydrogen Cars Now

Hyundai and Toyota are two companies leading the way in terms of hydrogen cars – so it’s safe to say that they’re not just a thing of the future, but they’re very much a reality now. When H2 cars become more widespread, the United States will be less dependent on foreign oil, achieve lower prices for gas, and reduce the amount of greenhouse gases that cause global warming.

 

In 2005, Honda became the first automaker to lease a commercial fuel cell vehicle (FCV) to a family in Redondo Beach, California. In 2008, the Honda FCX Clarity became the first production line FCV available for lease to the public. In late 2012, Hyundai started building production line fuel cell vehicles for sales to fleet managers worldwide.

 

For the past 36 years, the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been conducting research on fuel cells for use in transportation, industry and residential applications.

 

Hydrogen fuel cells are unique in that they offer the potential for zero emissions, as the only byproducts from these automobiles are heat and water vapor. In contrast, many of the current hybrid and “green” vehicles on the market still emit pollutants such as carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, nitrous oxide, ozone and microscopic particulate matter.

Zero Emissions

 

Hybrids and other green autos are a step in the right direction to address environmental issues, but only hydrogen cars have the promise of zero emissions of pollutants. The Environmental Protection Agency estimates that fossil-fuel automobiles emit 1 ½ billion tons of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere each year, but hydrogen fuel-based transportation would all but eliminate this.

 

In addition to this, H2 autos will reduce the United States’ reliance on foreign oil sources. The so-called “hydrogen highway” will lead to less dependence on OPEC, large U.S. oil companies, oil refinery malfunctions and disruptions, and less resistance from oil-producing nations like Venezuela and Saudi Arabia or from hostile nations.

Cluster Model

 

The cluster model for transitioning from gasoline-powered cars to hydrogen-powered cars involves building hydrogen fueling stations in high population areas and then gradually rolling out hydrogen cars in those areas. This will be done in larger cities first, and then the clusters of hydrogen refueling stations and fuel cell cars will eventually be connected through infrastructure.

 

The majority of scientists and engineers agree that converting from gasoline-powered internal combustion engines to hydrogen-powered internal combustion engines is a relatively easy transition. This would buy time for fuel cell cars to be fully adapted.

 

Hydrogen-on-demand vehicles and those that use hydrogen peroxide as a propellant are still contenders in the marketplace, avoiding the need for compressed or liquid hydrogen refueling altogether. And, what about adapting hydrogen peroxide for fuel in cars since it is currently being used in race cars and jet packs? These are other options to consider although they may be farther out on the timeline.

 

Hydrogen cars are the future, so take a test drive of this website right now and see what you’ll be driving a few short years from now. With Germany, Japan, Scandinavi.The hydrogen economy is rapidly approaching and Great Britain and the United States are in the hunt. Are you ready?

 

On June 10, 2014, Hyundai handed the keys to Tim Bush and family so that they can drive the first mass-produced hydrogen fuel cell vehicle available for lease by a consumer in the United States. 

Is High Octane Gas Really Needed?

Main
One of the things people commonly overlook when buying a car is checking which type of fuel it requires. People are so focused on the driving experience, how it looks,…
Read More

Hydrogen Cars Now

Main
Hyundai and Toyota are two companies leading the way in terms of hydrogen cars – so it’s safe to say that they’re not just a thing of the future, but…
Read More

Hydrogen Cars Now

Hyundai and Toyota are two companies leading the way in terms of hydrogen cars – so it’s safe to say…

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One of the things people commonly overlook when buying a car is checking which type of fuel it requires. People are so focused on the driving experience, how it looks, and how the seats feel that they never think to open the fuel door or read the owner’s manual. It’s important to take note of this kind of detail because using the wrong fuel type can damage your car.

Higher octane fuel has a higher ignition point, which is necessary to prevent pinging (or preignition) in high compression engines.Compressing the fuel air mixture at a higher pressure is what allows some engines to produce more power despite their size. These are called high-compression engines.

If you buy a car with a high-compression engine, you’ll have to use higher octane fuel, which costs 25-40 cents more per gallon.

If your manufacturer recommends 93 octane, that means the car is designed to run best on 93 octane fuel. The car may have slightly more power and better gas mileage when you use 93 octane, but it also means that the car has a knock sensor. This sensor will adjust the spark timing when you use lower octane fuel, to prevent the engine from pinging and overheating.

On the other hand, cars that “require” high octane fuel also have knock sensors, manufacturers make no guarantee that you won’t damage your engine if you run it on regular fuel. Even though there’s a higher chance of damaging your engine, many people choose to cheap out and go with the lower grade gas.

If a car requires high octane fuel, it means that the manufacturer doesn’t guarantee that your engine will be safe if you use regular fuel instead. So, if you see a car that says it “requires” 93 octane fuel, then you should be aware that you might damage the engine if you use cheaper fuel.

Keep this in mind when you’re car shopping, so you can decide whether you want a car that requires high octane fuel or not. And then you’ll know whether you have to choose between the Five Series and Fido.

Does higher octane clean your engine?

High octane gasoline will not clean your engine better than regular gasoline. In fact, high octane gasoline does not have any benefits in preventing engine deposits, removing them, or cleaning your car’s engine.

Does high octane fuel make a difference?

The octane rating is a measure of a fuel’s ability to resist “knocking” or “pinging” during combustion, caused by the air/fuel mixture detonating prematurely in the engine. … In order to prevent this knocking, higher octane fuels are used in high performance engines that run at higher compression ratios.

Does premium gas give better mileage?

Premium gas might give you a few more miles per gallon than regular gas, but you’re not getting as much of a difference as you might think. In fact, the fuel economy will vary more between different brands of regular gas than it will between the same manufacturer’s regular and premium gas.

What happens if you put 93 instead of 87?

If you accidentally put in a higher octane blend of gasoline than what you usually use (say, 91, 92, or 93), don’t fret. You’re not damaging your car or truck by filling it with a gas that burns differently in your engine. In fact, you might even see a slight improvement in your car’s performance!

Hyundai and Toyota are two companies leading the way in terms of hydrogen cars – so it’s safe to say that they’re not just a thing of the future, but they’re very much a reality now. When H2 cars become more widespread, the United States will be less dependent on foreign oil, achieve lower prices for gas, and reduce the amount of greenhouse gases that cause global warming.

 

In 2005, Honda became the first automaker to lease a commercial fuel cell vehicle (FCV) to a family in Redondo Beach, California. In 2008, the Honda FCX Clarity became the first production line FCV available for lease to the public. In late 2012, Hyundai started building production line fuel cell vehicles for sales to fleet managers worldwide.

 

For the past 36 years, the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been conducting research on fuel cells for use in transportation, industry and residential applications.

 

Hydrogen fuel cells are unique in that they offer the potential for zero emissions, as the only byproducts from these automobiles are heat and water vapor. In contrast, many of the current hybrid and “green” vehicles on the market still emit pollutants such as carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, nitrous oxide, ozone and microscopic particulate matter.

Zero Emissions

 

Hybrids and other green autos are a step in the right direction to address environmental issues, but only hydrogen cars have the promise of zero emissions of pollutants. The Environmental Protection Agency estimates that fossil-fuel automobiles emit 1 ½ billion tons of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere each year, but hydrogen fuel-based transportation would all but eliminate this.

 

In addition to this, H2 autos will reduce the United States’ reliance on foreign oil sources. The so-called “hydrogen highway” will lead to less dependence on OPEC, large U.S. oil companies, oil refinery malfunctions and disruptions, and less resistance from oil-producing nations like Venezuela and Saudi Arabia or from hostile nations.

Cluster Model

 

The cluster model for transitioning from gasoline-powered cars to hydrogen-powered cars involves building hydrogen fueling stations in high population areas and then gradually rolling out hydrogen cars in those areas. This will be done in larger cities first, and then the clusters of hydrogen refueling stations and fuel cell cars will eventually be connected through infrastructure.

 

The majority of scientists and engineers agree that converting from gasoline-powered internal combustion engines to hydrogen-powered internal combustion engines is a relatively easy transition. This would buy time for fuel cell cars to be fully adapted.

 

Hydrogen-on-demand vehicles and those that use hydrogen peroxide as a propellant are still contenders in the marketplace, avoiding the need for compressed or liquid hydrogen refueling altogether. And, what about adapting hydrogen peroxide for fuel in cars since it is currently being used in race cars and jet packs? These are other options to consider although they may be farther out on the timeline.

 

Hydrogen cars are the future, so take a test drive of this website right now and see what you’ll be driving a few short years from now. With Germany, Japan, Scandinavi.The hydrogen economy is rapidly approaching and Great Britain and the United States are in the hunt. Are you ready?

 

On June 10, 2014, Hyundai handed the keys to Tim Bush and family so that they can drive the first mass-produced hydrogen fuel cell vehicle available for lease by a consumer in the United States. 

One of the things people commonly overlook when buying a car is checking which type of fuel it requires. People are so focused on the driving experience, how it looks, and how the seats feel that they never think to open the fuel door or read the owner’s manual. It’s important to take note of this kind of detail because using the wrong fuel type can damage your car.

Higher octane fuel has a higher ignition point, which is necessary to prevent pinging (or preignition) in high compression engines.Compressing the fuel air mixture at a higher pressure is what allows some engines to produce more power despite their size. These are called high-compression engines.

If you buy a car with a high-compression engine, you’ll have to use higher octane fuel, which costs 25-40 cents more per gallon.

If your manufacturer recommends 93 octane, that means the car is designed to run best on 93 octane fuel. The car may have slightly more power and better gas mileage when you use 93 octane, but it also means that the car has a knock sensor. This sensor will adjust the spark timing when you use lower octane fuel, to prevent the engine from pinging and overheating.

On the other hand, cars that “require” high octane fuel also have knock sensors, manufacturers make no guarantee that you won’t damage your engine if you run it on regular fuel. Even though there’s a higher chance of damaging your engine, many people choose to cheap out and go with the lower grade gas.

If a car requires high octane fuel, it means that the manufacturer doesn’t guarantee that your engine will be safe if you use regular fuel instead. So, if you see a car that says it “requires” 93 octane fuel, then you should be aware that you might damage the engine if you use cheaper fuel.

Keep this in mind when you’re car shopping, so you can decide whether you want a car that requires high octane fuel or not. And then you’ll know whether you have to choose between the Five Series and Fido.

Does higher octane clean your engine?

High octane gasoline will not clean your engine better than regular gasoline. In fact, high octane gasoline does not have any benefits in preventing engine deposits, removing them, or cleaning your car’s engine.

Does high octane fuel make a difference?

The octane rating is a measure of a fuel’s ability to resist “knocking” or “pinging” during combustion, caused by the air/fuel mixture detonating prematurely in the engine. … In order to prevent this knocking, higher octane fuels are used in high performance engines that run at higher compression ratios.

Does premium gas give better mileage?

Premium gas might give you a few more miles per gallon than regular gas, but you’re not getting as much of a difference as you might think. In fact, the fuel economy will vary more between different brands of regular gas than it will between the same manufacturer’s regular and premium gas.

What happens if you put 93 instead of 87?

If you accidentally put in a higher octane blend of gasoline than what you usually use (say, 91, 92, or 93), don’t fret. You’re not damaging your car or truck by filling it with a gas that burns differently in your engine. In fact, you might even see a slight improvement in your car’s performance!

Hyundai and Toyota are two companies leading the way in terms of hydrogen cars – so it’s safe to say that they’re not just a thing of the future, but they’re very much a reality now. When H2 cars become more widespread, the United States will be less dependent on foreign oil, achieve lower prices for gas, and reduce the amount of greenhouse gases that cause global warming.

 

In 2005, Honda became the first automaker to lease a commercial fuel cell vehicle (FCV) to a family in Redondo Beach, California. In 2008, the Honda FCX Clarity became the first production line FCV available for lease to the public. In late 2012, Hyundai started building production line fuel cell vehicles for sales to fleet managers worldwide.

 

For the past 36 years, the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been conducting research on fuel cells for use in transportation, industry and residential applications.

 

Hydrogen fuel cells are unique in that they offer the potential for zero emissions, as the only byproducts from these automobiles are heat and water vapor. In contrast, many of the current hybrid and “green” vehicles on the market still emit pollutants such as carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, nitrous oxide, ozone and microscopic particulate matter.

Zero Emissions

 

Hybrids and other green autos are a step in the right direction to address environmental issues, but only hydrogen cars have the promise of zero emissions of pollutants. The Environmental Protection Agency estimates that fossil-fuel automobiles emit 1 ½ billion tons of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere each year, but hydrogen fuel-based transportation would all but eliminate this.

 

In addition to this, H2 autos will reduce the United States’ reliance on foreign oil sources. The so-called “hydrogen highway” will lead to less dependence on OPEC, large U.S. oil companies, oil refinery malfunctions and disruptions, and less resistance from oil-producing nations like Venezuela and Saudi Arabia or from hostile nations.

Cluster Model

 

The cluster model for transitioning from gasoline-powered cars to hydrogen-powered cars involves building hydrogen fueling stations in high population areas and then gradually rolling out hydrogen cars in those areas. This will be done in larger cities first, and then the clusters of hydrogen refueling stations and fuel cell cars will eventually be connected through infrastructure.

 

The majority of scientists and engineers agree that converting from gasoline-powered internal combustion engines to hydrogen-powered internal combustion engines is a relatively easy transition. This would buy time for fuel cell cars to be fully adapted.

 

Hydrogen-on-demand vehicles and those that use hydrogen peroxide as a propellant are still contenders in the marketplace, avoiding the need for compressed or liquid hydrogen refueling altogether. And, what about adapting hydrogen peroxide for fuel in cars since it is currently being used in race cars and jet packs? These are other options to consider although they may be farther out on the timeline.

 

Hydrogen cars are the future, so take a test drive of this website right now and see what you’ll be driving a few short years from now. With Germany, Japan, Scandinavi.The hydrogen economy is rapidly approaching and Great Britain and the United States are in the hunt. Are you ready?

 

On June 10, 2014, Hyundai handed the keys to Tim Bush and family so that they can drive the first mass-produced hydrogen fuel cell vehicle available for lease by a consumer in the United States. 

One of the things people commonly overlook when buying a car is checking which type of fuel it requires. People are so focused on the driving experience, how it looks, and how the seats feel that they never think to open the fuel door or read the owner’s manual. It’s important to take note of this kind of detail because using the wrong fuel type can damage your car.

Higher octane fuel has a higher ignition point, which is necessary to prevent pinging (or preignition) in high compression engines.Compressing the fuel air mixture at a higher pressure is what allows some engines to produce more power despite their size. These are called high-compression engines.

If you buy a car with a high-compression engine, you’ll have to use higher octane fuel, which costs 25-40 cents more per gallon.

If your manufacturer recommends 93 octane, that means the car is designed to run best on 93 octane fuel. The car may have slightly more power and better gas mileage when you use 93 octane, but it also means that the car has a knock sensor. This sensor will adjust the spark timing when you use lower octane fuel, to prevent the engine from pinging and overheating.

On the other hand, cars that “require” high octane fuel also have knock sensors, manufacturers make no guarantee that you won’t damage your engine if you run it on regular fuel. Even though there’s a higher chance of damaging your engine, many people choose to cheap out and go with the lower grade gas.

If a car requires high octane fuel, it means that the manufacturer doesn’t guarantee that your engine will be safe if you use regular fuel instead. So, if you see a car that says it “requires” 93 octane fuel, then you should be aware that you might damage the engine if you use cheaper fuel.

Keep this in mind when you’re car shopping, so you can decide whether you want a car that requires high octane fuel or not. And then you’ll know whether you have to choose between the Five Series and Fido.

Does higher octane clean your engine?

High octane gasoline will not clean your engine better than regular gasoline. In fact, high octane gasoline does not have any benefits in preventing engine deposits, removing them, or cleaning your car’s engine.

Does high octane fuel make a difference?

The octane rating is a measure of a fuel’s ability to resist “knocking” or “pinging” during combustion, caused by the air/fuel mixture detonating prematurely in the engine. … In order to prevent this knocking, higher octane fuels are used in high performance engines that run at higher compression ratios.

Does premium gas give better mileage?

Premium gas might give you a few more miles per gallon than regular gas, but you’re not getting as much of a difference as you might think. In fact, the fuel economy will vary more between different brands of regular gas than it will between the same manufacturer’s regular and premium gas.

What happens if you put 93 instead of 87?

If you accidentally put in a higher octane blend of gasoline than what you usually use (say, 91, 92, or 93), don’t fret. You’re not damaging your car or truck by filling it with a gas that burns differently in your engine. In fact, you might even see a slight improvement in your car’s performance!

Hyundai and Toyota are two companies leading the way in terms of hydrogen cars – so it’s safe to say that they’re not just a thing of the future, but they’re very much a reality now. When H2 cars become more widespread, the United States will be less dependent on foreign oil, achieve lower prices for gas, and reduce the amount of greenhouse gases that cause global warming.

 

In 2005, Honda became the first automaker to lease a commercial fuel cell vehicle (FCV) to a family in Redondo Beach, California. In 2008, the Honda FCX Clarity became the first production line FCV available for lease to the public. In late 2012, Hyundai started building production line fuel cell vehicles for sales to fleet managers worldwide.

 

For the past 36 years, the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been conducting research on fuel cells for use in transportation, industry and residential applications.

 

Hydrogen fuel cells are unique in that they offer the potential for zero emissions, as the only byproducts from these automobiles are heat and water vapor. In contrast, many of the current hybrid and “green” vehicles on the market still emit pollutants such as carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, nitrous oxide, ozone and microscopic particulate matter.

Zero Emissions

 

Hybrids and other green autos are a step in the right direction to address environmental issues, but only hydrogen cars have the promise of zero emissions of pollutants. The Environmental Protection Agency estimates that fossil-fuel automobiles emit 1 ½ billion tons of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere each year, but hydrogen fuel-based transportation would all but eliminate this.

 

In addition to this, H2 autos will reduce the United States’ reliance on foreign oil sources. The so-called “hydrogen highway” will lead to less dependence on OPEC, large U.S. oil companies, oil refinery malfunctions and disruptions, and less resistance from oil-producing nations like Venezuela and Saudi Arabia or from hostile nations.

Cluster Model

 

The cluster model for transitioning from gasoline-powered cars to hydrogen-powered cars involves building hydrogen fueling stations in high population areas and then gradually rolling out hydrogen cars in those areas. This will be done in larger cities first, and then the clusters of hydrogen refueling stations and fuel cell cars will eventually be connected through infrastructure.

 

The majority of scientists and engineers agree that converting from gasoline-powered internal combustion engines to hydrogen-powered internal combustion engines is a relatively easy transition. This would buy time for fuel cell cars to be fully adapted.

 

Hydrogen-on-demand vehicles and those that use hydrogen peroxide as a propellant are still contenders in the marketplace, avoiding the need for compressed or liquid hydrogen refueling altogether. And, what about adapting hydrogen peroxide for fuel in cars since it is currently being used in race cars and jet packs? These are other options to consider although they may be farther out on the timeline.

 

Hydrogen cars are the future, so take a test drive of this website right now and see what you’ll be driving a few short years from now. With Germany, Japan, Scandinavi.The hydrogen economy is rapidly approaching and Great Britain and the United States are in the hunt. Are you ready?

 

On June 10, 2014, Hyundai handed the keys to Tim Bush and family so that they can drive the first mass-produced hydrogen fuel cell vehicle available for lease by a consumer in the United States. 

One of the things people commonly overlook when buying a car is checking which type of fuel it requires. People are so focused on the driving experience, how it looks, and how the seats feel that they never think to open the fuel door or read the owner’s manual. It’s important to take note of this kind of detail because using the wrong fuel type can damage your car.

Higher octane fuel has a higher ignition point, which is necessary to prevent pinging (or preignition) in high compression engines.Compressing the fuel air mixture at a higher pressure is what allows some engines to produce more power despite their size. These are called high-compression engines.

If you buy a car with a high-compression engine, you’ll have to use higher octane fuel, which costs 25-40 cents more per gallon.

If your manufacturer recommends 93 octane, that means the car is designed to run best on 93 octane fuel. The car may have slightly more power and better gas mileage when you use 93 octane, but it also means that the car has a knock sensor. This sensor will adjust the spark timing when you use lower octane fuel, to prevent the engine from pinging and overheating.

On the other hand, cars that “require” high octane fuel also have knock sensors, manufacturers make no guarantee that you won’t damage your engine if you run it on regular fuel. Even though there’s a higher chance of damaging your engine, many people choose to cheap out and go with the lower grade gas.

If a car requires high octane fuel, it means that the manufacturer doesn’t guarantee that your engine will be safe if you use regular fuel instead. So, if you see a car that says it “requires” 93 octane fuel, then you should be aware that you might damage the engine if you use cheaper fuel.

Keep this in mind when you’re car shopping, so you can decide whether you want a car that requires high octane fuel or not. And then you’ll know whether you have to choose between the Five Series and Fido.

Does higher octane clean your engine?

High octane gasoline will not clean your engine better than regular gasoline. In fact, high octane gasoline does not have any benefits in preventing engine deposits, removing them, or cleaning your car’s engine.

Does high octane fuel make a difference?

The octane rating is a measure of a fuel’s ability to resist “knocking” or “pinging” during combustion, caused by the air/fuel mixture detonating prematurely in the engine. … In order to prevent this knocking, higher octane fuels are used in high performance engines that run at higher compression ratios.

Does premium gas give better mileage?

Premium gas might give you a few more miles per gallon than regular gas, but you’re not getting as much of a difference as you might think. In fact, the fuel economy will vary more between different brands of regular gas than it will between the same manufacturer’s regular and premium gas.

What happens if you put 93 instead of 87?

If you accidentally put in a higher octane blend of gasoline than what you usually use (say, 91, 92, or 93), don’t fret. You’re not damaging your car or truck by filling it with a gas that burns differently in your engine. In fact, you might even see a slight improvement in your car’s performance!

Hyundai and Toyota are two companies leading the way in terms of hydrogen cars – so it’s safe to say that they’re not just a thing of the future, but they’re very much a reality now. When H2 cars become more widespread, the United States will be less dependent on foreign oil, achieve lower prices for gas, and reduce the amount of greenhouse gases that cause global warming.

 

In 2005, Honda became the first automaker to lease a commercial fuel cell vehicle (FCV) to a family in Redondo Beach, California. In 2008, the Honda FCX Clarity became the first production line FCV available for lease to the public. In late 2012, Hyundai started building production line fuel cell vehicles for sales to fleet managers worldwide.

 

For the past 36 years, the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been conducting research on fuel cells for use in transportation, industry and residential applications.

 

Hydrogen fuel cells are unique in that they offer the potential for zero emissions, as the only byproducts from these automobiles are heat and water vapor. In contrast, many of the current hybrid and “green” vehicles on the market still emit pollutants such as carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, nitrous oxide, ozone and microscopic particulate matter.

Zero Emissions

 

Hybrids and other green autos are a step in the right direction to address environmental issues, but only hydrogen cars have the promise of zero emissions of pollutants. The Environmental Protection Agency estimates that fossil-fuel automobiles emit 1 ½ billion tons of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere each year, but hydrogen fuel-based transportation would all but eliminate this.

 

In addition to this, H2 autos will reduce the United States’ reliance on foreign oil sources. The so-called “hydrogen highway” will lead to less dependence on OPEC, large U.S. oil companies, oil refinery malfunctions and disruptions, and less resistance from oil-producing nations like Venezuela and Saudi Arabia or from hostile nations.

Cluster Model

 

The cluster model for transitioning from gasoline-powered cars to hydrogen-powered cars involves building hydrogen fueling stations in high population areas and then gradually rolling out hydrogen cars in those areas. This will be done in larger cities first, and then the clusters of hydrogen refueling stations and fuel cell cars will eventually be connected through infrastructure.

 

The majority of scientists and engineers agree that converting from gasoline-powered internal combustion engines to hydrogen-powered internal combustion engines is a relatively easy transition. This would buy time for fuel cell cars to be fully adapted.

 

Hydrogen-on-demand vehicles and those that use hydrogen peroxide as a propellant are still contenders in the marketplace, avoiding the need for compressed or liquid hydrogen refueling altogether. And, what about adapting hydrogen peroxide for fuel in cars since it is currently being used in race cars and jet packs? These are other options to consider although they may be farther out on the timeline.

 

Hydrogen cars are the future, so take a test drive of this website right now and see what you’ll be driving a few short years from now. With Germany, Japan, Scandinavi.The hydrogen economy is rapidly approaching and Great Britain and the United States are in the hunt. Are you ready?

 

On June 10, 2014, Hyundai handed the keys to Tim Bush and family so that they can drive the first mass-produced hydrogen fuel cell vehicle available for lease by a consumer in the United States. 

One of the things people commonly overlook when buying a car is checking which type of fuel it requires. People are so focused on the driving experience, how it looks, and how the seats feel that they never think to open the fuel door or read the owner’s manual. It’s important to take note of this kind of detail because using the wrong fuel type can damage your car.

Higher octane fuel has a higher ignition point, which is necessary to prevent pinging (or preignition) in high compression engines.Compressing the fuel air mixture at a higher pressure is what allows some engines to produce more power despite their size. These are called high-compression engines.

If you buy a car with a high-compression engine, you’ll have to use higher octane fuel, which costs 25-40 cents more per gallon.

If your manufacturer recommends 93 octane, that means the car is designed to run best on 93 octane fuel. The car may have slightly more power and better gas mileage when you use 93 octane, but it also means that the car has a knock sensor. This sensor will adjust the spark timing when you use lower octane fuel, to prevent the engine from pinging and overheating.

On the other hand, cars that “require” high octane fuel also have knock sensors, manufacturers make no guarantee that you won’t damage your engine if you run it on regular fuel. Even though there’s a higher chance of damaging your engine, many people choose to cheap out and go with the lower grade gas.

If a car requires high octane fuel, it means that the manufacturer doesn’t guarantee that your engine will be safe if you use regular fuel instead. So, if you see a car that says it “requires” 93 octane fuel, then you should be aware that you might damage the engine if you use cheaper fuel.

Keep this in mind when you’re car shopping, so you can decide whether you want a car that requires high octane fuel or not. And then you’ll know whether you have to choose between the Five Series and Fido.

Does higher octane clean your engine?

High octane gasoline will not clean your engine better than regular gasoline. In fact, high octane gasoline does not have any benefits in preventing engine deposits, removing them, or cleaning your car’s engine.

Does high octane fuel make a difference?

The octane rating is a measure of a fuel’s ability to resist “knocking” or “pinging” during combustion, caused by the air/fuel mixture detonating prematurely in the engine. … In order to prevent this knocking, higher octane fuels are used in high performance engines that run at higher compression ratios.

Does premium gas give better mileage?

Premium gas might give you a few more miles per gallon than regular gas, but you’re not getting as much of a difference as you might think. In fact, the fuel economy will vary more between different brands of regular gas than it will between the same manufacturer’s regular and premium gas.

What happens if you put 93 instead of 87?

If you accidentally put in a higher octane blend of gasoline than what you usually use (say, 91, 92, or 93), don’t fret. You’re not damaging your car or truck by filling it with a gas that burns differently in your engine. In fact, you might even see a slight improvement in your car’s performance!

Hyundai and Toyota are two companies leading the way in terms of hydrogen cars – so it’s safe to say that they’re not just a thing of the future, but they’re very much a reality now. When H2 cars become more widespread, the United States will be less dependent on foreign oil, achieve lower prices for gas, and reduce the amount of greenhouse gases that cause global warming.

 

In 2005, Honda became the first automaker to lease a commercial fuel cell vehicle (FCV) to a family in Redondo Beach, California. In 2008, the Honda FCX Clarity became the first production line FCV available for lease to the public. In late 2012, Hyundai started building production line fuel cell vehicles for sales to fleet managers worldwide.

 

For the past 36 years, the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been conducting research on fuel cells for use in transportation, industry and residential applications.

 

Hydrogen fuel cells are unique in that they offer the potential for zero emissions, as the only byproducts from these automobiles are heat and water vapor. In contrast, many of the current hybrid and “green” vehicles on the market still emit pollutants such as carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, nitrous oxide, ozone and microscopic particulate matter.

Zero Emissions

 

Hybrids and other green autos are a step in the right direction to address environmental issues, but only hydrogen cars have the promise of zero emissions of pollutants. The Environmental Protection Agency estimates that fossil-fuel automobiles emit 1 ½ billion tons of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere each year, but hydrogen fuel-based transportation would all but eliminate this.

 

In addition to this, H2 autos will reduce the United States’ reliance on foreign oil sources. The so-called “hydrogen highway” will lead to less dependence on OPEC, large U.S. oil companies, oil refinery malfunctions and disruptions, and less resistance from oil-producing nations like Venezuela and Saudi Arabia or from hostile nations.

Cluster Model

 

The cluster model for transitioning from gasoline-powered cars to hydrogen-powered cars involves building hydrogen fueling stations in high population areas and then gradually rolling out hydrogen cars in those areas. This will be done in larger cities first, and then the clusters of hydrogen refueling stations and fuel cell cars will eventually be connected through infrastructure.

 

The majority of scientists and engineers agree that converting from gasoline-powered internal combustion engines to hydrogen-powered internal combustion engines is a relatively easy transition. This would buy time for fuel cell cars to be fully adapted.

 

Hydrogen-on-demand vehicles and those that use hydrogen peroxide as a propellant are still contenders in the marketplace, avoiding the need for compressed or liquid hydrogen refueling altogether. And, what about adapting hydrogen peroxide for fuel in cars since it is currently being used in race cars and jet packs? These are other options to consider although they may be farther out on the timeline.

 

Hydrogen cars are the future, so take a test drive of this website right now and see what you’ll be driving a few short years from now. With Germany, Japan, Scandinavi.The hydrogen economy is rapidly approaching and Great Britain and the United States are in the hunt. Are you ready?

 

On June 10, 2014, Hyundai handed the keys to Tim Bush and family so that they can drive the first mass-produced hydrogen fuel cell vehicle available for lease by a consumer in the United States. 

One of the things people commonly overlook when buying a car is checking which type of fuel it requires. People are so focused on the driving experience, how it looks, and how the seats feel that they never think to open the fuel door or read the owner’s manual. It’s important to take note of this kind of detail because using the wrong fuel type can damage your car.

Higher octane fuel has a higher ignition point, which is necessary to prevent pinging (or preignition) in high compression engines.Compressing the fuel air mixture at a higher pressure is what allows some engines to produce more power despite their size. These are called high-compression engines.

If you buy a car with a high-compression engine, you’ll have to use higher octane fuel, which costs 25-40 cents more per gallon.

If your manufacturer recommends 93 octane, that means the car is designed to run best on 93 octane fuel. The car may have slightly more power and better gas mileage when you use 93 octane, but it also means that the car has a knock sensor. This sensor will adjust the spark timing when you use lower octane fuel, to prevent the engine from pinging and overheating.

On the other hand, cars that “require” high octane fuel also have knock sensors, manufacturers make no guarantee that you won’t damage your engine if you run it on regular fuel. Even though there’s a higher chance of damaging your engine, many people choose to cheap out and go with the lower grade gas.

If a car requires high octane fuel, it means that the manufacturer doesn’t guarantee that your engine will be safe if you use regular fuel instead. So, if you see a car that says it “requires” 93 octane fuel, then you should be aware that you might damage the engine if you use cheaper fuel.

Keep this in mind when you’re car shopping, so you can decide whether you want a car that requires high octane fuel or not. And then you’ll know whether you have to choose between the Five Series and Fido.

Does higher octane clean your engine?

High octane gasoline will not clean your engine better than regular gasoline. In fact, high octane gasoline does not have any benefits in preventing engine deposits, removing them, or cleaning your car’s engine.

Does high octane fuel make a difference?

The octane rating is a measure of a fuel’s ability to resist “knocking” or “pinging” during combustion, caused by the air/fuel mixture detonating prematurely in the engine. … In order to prevent this knocking, higher octane fuels are used in high performance engines that run at higher compression ratios.

Does premium gas give better mileage?

Premium gas might give you a few more miles per gallon than regular gas, but you’re not getting as much of a difference as you might think. In fact, the fuel economy will vary more between different brands of regular gas than it will between the same manufacturer’s regular and premium gas.

What happens if you put 93 instead of 87?

If you accidentally put in a higher octane blend of gasoline than what you usually use (say, 91, 92, or 93), don’t fret. You’re not damaging your car or truck by filling it with a gas that burns differently in your engine. In fact, you might even see a slight improvement in your car’s performance!

Hyundai and Toyota are two companies leading the way in terms of hydrogen cars – so it’s safe to say that they’re not just a thing of the future, but they’re very much a reality now. When H2 cars become more widespread, the United States will be less dependent on foreign oil, achieve lower prices for gas, and reduce the amount of greenhouse gases that cause global warming.

 

In 2005, Honda became the first automaker to lease a commercial fuel cell vehicle (FCV) to a family in Redondo Beach, California. In 2008, the Honda FCX Clarity became the first production line FCV available for lease to the public. In late 2012, Hyundai started building production line fuel cell vehicles for sales to fleet managers worldwide.

 

For the past 36 years, the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been conducting research on fuel cells for use in transportation, industry and residential applications.

 

Hydrogen fuel cells are unique in that they offer the potential for zero emissions, as the only byproducts from these automobiles are heat and water vapor. In contrast, many of the current hybrid and “green” vehicles on the market still emit pollutants such as carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, nitrous oxide, ozone and microscopic particulate matter.

Zero Emissions

 

Hybrids and other green autos are a step in the right direction to address environmental issues, but only hydrogen cars have the promise of zero emissions of pollutants. The Environmental Protection Agency estimates that fossil-fuel automobiles emit 1 ½ billion tons of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere each year, but hydrogen fuel-based transportation would all but eliminate this.

 

In addition to this, H2 autos will reduce the United States’ reliance on foreign oil sources. The so-called “hydrogen highway” will lead to less dependence on OPEC, large U.S. oil companies, oil refinery malfunctions and disruptions, and less resistance from oil-producing nations like Venezuela and Saudi Arabia or from hostile nations.

Cluster Model

 

The cluster model for transitioning from gasoline-powered cars to hydrogen-powered cars involves building hydrogen fueling stations in high population areas and then gradually rolling out hydrogen cars in those areas. This will be done in larger cities first, and then the clusters of hydrogen refueling stations and fuel cell cars will eventually be connected through infrastructure.

 

The majority of scientists and engineers agree that converting from gasoline-powered internal combustion engines to hydrogen-powered internal combustion engines is a relatively easy transition. This would buy time for fuel cell cars to be fully adapted.

 

Hydrogen-on-demand vehicles and those that use hydrogen peroxide as a propellant are still contenders in the marketplace, avoiding the need for compressed or liquid hydrogen refueling altogether. And, what about adapting hydrogen peroxide for fuel in cars since it is currently being used in race cars and jet packs? These are other options to consider although they may be farther out on the timeline.

 

Hydrogen cars are the future, so take a test drive of this website right now and see what you’ll be driving a few short years from now. With Germany, Japan, Scandinavi.The hydrogen economy is rapidly approaching and Great Britain and the United States are in the hunt. Are you ready?

 

On June 10, 2014, Hyundai handed the keys to Tim Bush and family so that they can drive the first mass-produced hydrogen fuel cell vehicle available for lease by a consumer in the United States.